BIOS² Program for Graduate Students 

The 2021 call to apply as a Fellow for the Computational Biodiversity Science and Services (BIOS²) training program is now open and applications will be accepted until July 18, 2021.

BIOS2 is a community of early career researchers who are learning and applying modern-day computational and quantitative techniques to biodiversity challenges. The BIOS2 training program is a NSERC-CREATE program that aims at widening opportunities and skill sets among students and postdoctoral fellows and increasing recruitment in Biodiversity science in the Canadian job market.

We welcome applications from graduate students with diverse background and experience who share a passion for biodiversity and a curiosity for computation!

For information: https://bios2.usherbrooke.ca/get-involved/graduate-students/
To apply: https://bios2.usherbrooke.ca/2021/06/21/bios2-fellows-2021-2022/
To share on tweeter: https://twitter.com/_bios2/status/1407063540142325766?s=20

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2021 Summer School in Biodiversity Modelling with the following theme:  Evaluating Models with Ecological Data

The objective of this course is to train students methods and skills to fit models to ecological data. Emphasis will be put on algorithms and computational methods in order to develop abilities to solve a wide range of problems.

August 16 to 25, 2021

Online and hybrid training. Courses will be online with the possibility of organizing local hubs (according to public health directives). Courses will be conducted in English, with bilingual support.

Registration by July 12, 2021

Poster: [Affiche_EcoleEte_Biodiversite_Web_EN]

Information and registration here [https://www.usherbrooke.ca/sciences-ete/en/summer-school-in-biodiversity-modelling-2021/summer-school-in-biodiversity-2021/] or here [https://bios2.usherbrooke.ca/2021/06/14/summer-school-biodiversity-modeling-2021/]

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CSEE Council Elections (excerpt from the May 2021 members bulletin)

Do you want to advance the profile of ecology, evolution, and conservation in Canada? Do you want to get things done on behalf of the broader community? Do have ideas, energy and a little bit of time?  Then run for CSEE Council!

We are now seeking nominations for the positions of: Secretary (3 year term), Regular Councillor (2 positions, 3 year terms) and Graduate Student/Post-doctoral Councillor (1 position, 2 year term).  You can read about what the jobs entail in our Standing Rules, available through this link: https://csee-scee.ca/constitution-2/

You may nominate yourself or a colleague (with their consent). Candidates, please write a short bio (7-10 lines) about you, what you will bring to the CSEE, and what you hope to accomplish. Send the bio along with a headshot to the CSEE Vice-President (jeannette(dot)whitton(at)botany.ubc.ca).

Nominations are accepted until July 1st 2021, with elections to take place in July. New council members will take up their positions following the 2021 AGM in August.

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PLANT PRACTITIONERS SURVEY

Do you study some aspect of plant ecology or evolution in Canada? Or do you work on the conservation and restoration of plants in Canada? We would like to hear your thoughts on the biggest knowledge gaps in research and applied conservation for plant species at risk in Canada. Please consider answering our 15 minute voluntary online survey for Canadian wild plant practitioners!

The survey was designed by a working group of Canadian scientists who study plants and plant conservation, led by Jenny McCune (University of Lethbridge), Jeannette Whitton (University of British Columbia), and Jana Vamosi (University of Calgary).

We are interested in hearing from people who work in all aspects of native plant conservation and management – those who work for government at the municipal, provincial, or federal levels, those who work in consulting, in the private sector, for non-governmental organizations, and in academia.

If you would like to participate, you can access the survey here:

http://jlmccune.weebly.com/survey.html

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Lecture series: Krebs’ Ecologists

These lectures, organized by Conabio’s Carlos Galindo, cover basic population ecology, biological control, small mammal population cycles, snowshoe hare cycles, epigenetics and population cycles, caribou populations, and population cycles of forest insects. Featuring some prominent CSEE members, these lectures may be of fundamental research interest and can be valuable teaching resources.

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLLAcoRHqCmNQ6oReV8ItIe3GzF9VXd93t

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CSEE BIPOC Spotlight Library Microgrants

One barrier to entry of underrepresented minorities, including BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, and People of Colour), into STEM is the shortage of visible models.  CSEE can help by drawing attention to BIPOC ecologists and evolutionary biologists.  This project will build a library of short videos by both emerging and established BIPOC scientists, and make that library available to university and K-12 instructors, youth groups, etc. across Canada.  By shining a spotlight on BIPOC models – who are underrepresented, but not absent – the library will create opportunities to support better representation in future.  It will also help our community diversify its teaching, its seminar series, and so on.  The program will also address another barrier to increasing BIPOC participation in science, which is financial; the library microgrants will provide direct remuneration plus no-cost membership and conference registration.

The microgrants

CSEE offers a microgrant to ecologists or evolutionary biologists who identify as BIPOC (up to the program’s budget limit).  A microgrant consists of $200 cash a free 2-year membership in the Society, and reimbursement of registration fees for one CSEE annual meeting within the 2 years following the award.

Microgrant recipients are asked to make two short videos of themselves:

  • One (2-3 min) video of them talking about who they are; what their current position is; how they got interested in E&E or their study system and (optionally) something about the path they’ve taken to their current position; and mentioning one exciting question in E&E they’d like to answer in their career.
  • The other (6-10 min) would include the same elements PLUS one question in E&E (big or small) that the recipient has answered, or is answering, in their work (not a Powerpoint, simply video of them).

The two videos constitute different resources for the community. The shorter videos will be appropriate for use at any level, and stress membership in the scientific community.  Because they are short, they will lend themselves well to being shown in combination.  The longer videos will be more appropriate for use in classes at the high school or postsecondary level, and demonstrate in addition contributions to knowledge.  It is perfectly appropriate for the content of an applicant’s shorter video to be reprised in the longer one – that is, we expect the two videos to overlap considerably.

Both videos should be pitched to a non-specialist audience – even if they are used in postsecondary ecology courses, a non-specialist pitch will make them accessible to all students. The editorial committee will supply advice on making a video like this (e.g. equipment, things to consider before/during filming, minor editing) and is happy to provide feedback or advice on proposed content, etc.  Applicants will also be connected with each other, when possible, so they can swap tips and experience.

All the videos will be shared on CSEE social media, hosted on the CSEE Youtube and made available on our web site for use in classes and presentations by professors, high-school teachers, outreach groups like Pint of Science, Let’s Talk Science, and youth groups like Scouting, etc.  CSEE will actively reach out to these organizations to publicize the video library.

Applying for a microgrant

Applicants should send a very brief proposal (no more than 200 words, describing very briefly the videos’ intended content) to the Chair of the Editorial Committee, peter.soroye@gmail.com.

Applicants should be members of CSEE, or non-members of CSEE who are Canadian or working or studying at a Canadian employer or institution.  Applicants are welcome from any career stage, but CSEE will seek to balance awardees between faculty, industry professionals, and students.  Should senior applicants wish to participate while waiving financial compensation, CSEE will use the budget room to recruit more early-career participants.

Editorial committee

CSEE Council will establish a committee of 3 Society members, at least 2 of them BIPOC, to provide guidance and insure that submissions align with the goals of the project.  It will report to the chair of the Awards Committee.  This is the same committee that will handle Resources Library submissions (see below).  BIPOC members of the editorial committee who do not serve on CSEE Council will receive a stipend for their service.

Budget

CSEE has budgeted $3000 in 2020 for this initiative (but we envision the project continuing into future years).  The cash payment portion of the microgrant is crucial, because it is unfair to ask BIPOC to do unpaid work to fix a problem that isn’t of their making. The cash amount is intended to represent fair market pay for the labour involved.

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CSEE Stands in Solidarity with Mi’kmaw Fishers

The Canadian Society for Ecology and Evolution (CSEE) supports the Mi’kmaw people in their efforts to manage and conduct sustainable fisheries in accordance with their treaty rights.

As scientists, we would like to emphasize that respecting the rights of the Sipekniꞌkatik First Nation is not in conflict with our understanding of relevant fisheries and conservation biology. There is no evidence that the lobster fishery currently being conducted by the Sipekniꞌkatik First Nation poses a threat to lobster populations. We are deeply concerned about the misuse of science to support acts of violence against Mi’kmaw fishers and their communities.

We join the calls for the federal government to take immediate and decisive action to protect Mi’kmaw fishers. In addition, the CSEE urges immediate action by the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans to work with the Mi’kmaq and develop fisheries management policies that incorporate the best available science advice.

Additional discussion about conservation issues related to the lobster fishery can be found in this recent article by Vanessa Minke-Martin in Hakai Magazine. https://www.hakaimagazine.com/news/mikmaw-fishery-dispute-is-not-about-conservation-scientists-say/

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Survey about the experiences of Early Career Researchers (ECRs) in the biological, ecological and environmental sciences

We invite you to participate in a survey about the experiences of Early Career Researchers (ECRs) in the biological, ecological and environmental sciences.

This is a global survey that will contribute to understanding the specific challenges ECRs face in progressing through their academic careers, and balancing work and personal life. The survey will also provide insights into the unprecedented impact that COVID-19 has had on academics at the early career stage.

You can access the survey here:

 https://uniofqueensland.syd1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_elLeXK3pdv8pksR

What do you need to know?

– The survey takes 10-15 minutes to complete

– It is anonymous and all questions are voluntary

– It is open to all Early Career Researchers working in the biological, ecological and environmental sciences (including related disciplines such as environmental social science)

– The survey closes at midnight Australian Eastern Standard Time on Friday, 28th August 2020.”

– For any enquiries about the research, please contact Dr Catarina SilvaDr Cecilia Villacorta-Rath or Dr Claudia Benham.

We understand that it is hard to find time in a busy work day to complete surveys, and we appreciate your time and contributions to this study.

Best wishes,

 Dr Catarina Silva, Dr Cecilia Villacorta-Rath and Dr Claudia Benham

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CSEE BIPOC Resources Library Microgrants

One barrier to inclusivity for underrepresented minorities, including BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, and People of Colour), in STEM is that most course materials lack representation of contributions from BIPOC. Similarly, most resources available for early-career researchers (or those mentoring them) do not reflect the experiences and additional challenges that BIPOC might face in STEM.  CSEE will commission the creation of two kinds of written materials: (1) articles highlighting research contributions of BIPOC researchers (worldwide, past or present) to E&E, that can be used as examples in undergraduate and/or K-12 curricula, and (2) articles written to help BIPOC navigate experiences in undergraduate or graduate school or in the field. Via our website and via direct outreach, CSEE will make these resources available to instructors, researchers, and departments of biology and cognate fields across Canada. The program will also address another barrier to increasing BIPOC participation in science, which is financial; the library microgrants will provide direct remuneration plus no-cost membership and conference registration.

The commissions

CSEE will commission the creation of (1) “Foundational research” articles and (2) “Navigating” articles.  While we suggest topics of interest below, CSEE is open to all proposals.

  1. “Foundational research” articles.
    • These will highlight foundational contributions by BIPOC researchers in ecology, evolution, and conservation biology. An applicant might write about any BIPOC researcher, worldwide, past or present.
    • Articles should include appropriately licensed photos or other illustrations, and should be relevant to commonly covered topics in introductory biology, ecology, evolution, or conservation courses. Photos of living human subjects must have photo releases.
    • An article could emphasize a particular piece of research or a researcher’s career contributions.
    • We encourage contributions from non-BIPOC authors, but these will be on a volunteer basis (non-remunerated). We encourage all career stages to get involved.
  2. “Navigating” articles. These will provide guidance for BIPOC navigating common situations in ecology and evolution, whether in learning or research.
  • Articles could address navigating situations in field work as a BIPOC; navigating situations in undergraduate study as a BIPOC; or navigating situations in grad school as a BIPOC.
  • “Navigational” articles are authored by, and share the views of, BIPOC members. We encourage all career stages to get involved.

 “Foundational Research” essays should be 500-1000 words, and BIPOC contributors will be paid $200 per essay.  “Navigating” essays can be longer upon agreement of the editorial committee, and will be paid at the rate of $200 per 1,000 words.  These rates are competitive with open-market freelance writing rates.

Applying for a microgrant

Applicants should send a very brief proposal (no more than 200 words, describing the article’s intended content/message) to the Chair of the Editorial Committee, peter.soroye@gmail.com.

Applicants should be members of CSEE, or non-members of CSEE who are Canadian or working or studying at a Canadian employer or institution.  Applicants are welcome from any career stage, but CSEE will seek to balance awardees between faculty, industry professionals, and students.  Should senior applicants wish to participate while waiving financial compensation, CSEE will use the budget room to recruit more early-career participants.

Editorial committee

CSEE Council will establish a committee of 3 Society members, at least 2 of them BIPOC, to provide guidance and insure that submissions align with the goals of the project.  It will report to the chair of the Awards Committee.  This is the same committee that will handle Spotlight Library submissions (see above).  BIPOC members of the editorial committee who do not serve on CSEE Council will receive a stipend for their service.

Posting and promotion

Materials will be made available online as they are approved, with promotion on social media etc. Links will be periodically sent to CSEE membership, and created materials will be promoted during the CSEE annual meeting. Applications will be accepted year- round (until all budgeted grants are awarded).

“Navigating” essays will have a two-week public comment period, after which the author would be asked to make any appropriate revisions. Public comment will help each article reflect multiple voices and lived experiences, without diminishing the experiences of the main author.

Budget

CSEE has budgeted $3000 in 2020 for this initiative (but we envision the project continuing into future years).  The cash payment portion of the microgrant is crucial, because it is unfair to ask BIPOC to do unpaid work to fix a problem that isn’t of their making. The cash amount is intended to represent fair market pay for the labour involved.

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