Temperature and Transients: PhD Positions in Population Ecology – Kim Cuddington (http://ecotheory.uwaterloo.ca), University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada

We have two graduate positions focused on developing mechanistic
models that relate thermal responses to short term population dynamics
(transients).  Our lab uses large datasets, computational, statistical
and mathematical approaches to answer questions about ectothermic
invasive species, species at risk and ecosystem engineers.  We are
particularly interested in the role of temperature extremes, variance
and autocorrelation in determining risks of invasive, extinction and
ecosystem impacts.

Positions to begin January 2022, but a remote start is possible
depending on travel restrictions at that time. We provide four years
of funding for students in a PhD program.

Please send an inquiry email providing an unofficial transcript, a
brief statement of research interests in ecology, and contact
information for three references (kcuddingATuwaterlooDOTca). The
application for graduate studies is here
(https://uwaterloo.ca/graduate-studies/application-admission/apply-online),
but please contact me directly regarding the deadlines.

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PHD (2) AND POSTDOC (1) POSITIONS OFFERED – People and trees: intimately connected by a shared microbiome in an urban world

AIM: Identify the direct and indirect impacts of urban tree diversity on public health to help city-planners reduce the incidence of autoimmune diseases in at-risk populations. 

Because this aim is considerable, we seek to constitute a team of members with complementary interests and skills. The specific tasks of each member will be determined at hiring.

OBJECTIVES: Over a gradient of social inequalities in two Canadian cities, we will: (1) compile tree diversity indicators using advanced ground-based and 3D remote sensing approaches; (2) identify and quantify airborne microorganisms, pollen, and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted by urban trees; (3) measure relationships between tree diversity, microbial diversity, pollen, VOCs, and public health (i.e., prevalence of asthma and allergies). Finally, we will (4) disseminate our results through an application that will allow end-users to estimate the health value of city-planning scenarios at the neighborhood level.

Click here for more information.

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PHD PROJECT IN FOREST GENETICS – Genetics and physiology of water stress in white spruce

Description: Assisted migration has been proposed as a proactive measure to maintain productivity and reduce the vulnerability of forest ecosystems to climate change. Seed transfer models have been developed to guide the choice of sources best adapted to the future climate and must incorporate the risks associated with drought events.

Click here for more information.

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Master of Science opportunity — Trent University

Conservation Value Assessment of the Boreal Forest

We are seeking an energetic, dedicated individual to conduct biogeographic research on the conservation value of the boreal forest in North America.  Starting September 2021, the student will enrol in the interdisciplinary Environmental & Life Sciences Graduate Program at Trent University.   The successful candidate will work under the supervision of Dr. James Schaefer (Trent University) and Dr. Stephen Mayor (Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources & Forestry), in close collaboration with Dr. Jeff Wells (National Audubon Society).

The goal of the project is to undertake conservation value accounting of the North American boreal forest — an evaluation the importance of this biome (one of the last great, intact tracts of forest on the planet) for various taxa, with a focus on mammals, trees, and insects.  Using GIS, the student will assemble digitized range maps to estimate the proportion of the total range of each species in the biome, then apply relative abundance measures to estimate the numbers of individuals for each species in the boreal.  The result will be a description of the conservation value and stewardship responsibility for each province and territory.

Stipend: Approximately $19,477 per year for 2 years (which includes a Teaching Assistantship of $11,177 per year for 2 years)

Application deadline: Applications will be reviewed promptly, with the intent of filling this position by January 2021.

Email a letter describing your interests along with your curriculum vitae and an unofficial copy of your transcripts to Prof. James Schaefer, jschaefer@trentu.ca

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PhD project – Application of remote sensing tools for assessing boreal forest dynamics in the Yukon

The Integrative Wildlife Conservation lab at Trent University is offering a PhD project on the application of remote sensing technologies for monitoring boreal forest structure and function near Kluane Lake, Yukon. For decades we have conducted research on Canada lynx and their prey in the Kluane region, and the current project extends these investigations into the realm of vegetation and snow dynamics in this rapidly-changing northern landscape. Using a recently-acquired unmanned aerial vehicle equipped with LiDAR, multispectral, hyperspectral, thermal and RGB cameras, we will investigate: 1) how patterns of forest productivity vary dynamically across space and time; 2) sources of forest heterogeneity and resiliency to climate change and insect outbreaks; and 3) how snow conditions vary through time and affect wildlife habitat availability. In addition, this project provides several additional opportunities and potential collaborations with ongoing research related to: 4) validating cutting-edge remote sensing technologies in forest health assessment; 5) forecasting future boreal forest dynamics under climate change; and 6) relating forest characteristics to the movements and habitat selection of Canada lynx and snowshoe hares that are radio-collared with GPS transmitters. The PhD student will have the opportunity to develop specific research questions within the scope of the larger project.

Successful candidates MUST have an MSc in Ecology, Remote Sensing, or related field, demonstrated evidence of peer-reviewed publications, strong field and quantitative skills, and an interest in working collaboratively within a large and diverse research group. Additional desirable skills include application of GIS technologies and related software, experience in drone operation, and working in remote field conditions.  Start date is ASAP.

To apply, send a cover letter, curriculum vitae, unofficial academic transcript, and contact information for 3 references to: Dennis Murray (dennismurray@trentu.ca).

For additional details, see www.dennismurray.ca.

The position will be filled as soon as a suitable candidate is found.

 

 

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PhD project – Canada lynx population ecology and predator-prey dynamics in the Yukon

The Integrative Wildlife Conservation lab at Trent University is offering a PhD project on lynx population dynamics and foraging ecology near Kluane Lake, Yukon. Our research on lynx and their prey in the Kluane region spans decades, and the current project builds on our recent work assessing the functional response of lynx to different prey types and how such relationships are more complex than previously thought (see Chan et al. 2017, Ecology DOI:10.1002/ecy.1828; Studd, E. et al. 2021. doi.org/10.1111/2041-210X.13605b.). Specifically, through lynx satellite telemetry and accelerometry, and assessment of prey distribution and abundance, we aim to understand the mechanisms driving lynx movements and population dynamics relative to their primary (snowshoe hare) and secondary (red squirrel) prey species across space and time. We have studied lynx intensively for 6 winters during a period of hare abundance and decline at Kluane, so the ongoing cyclic crash in hare numbers presents a fascinating opportunity to assess variation in lynx foraging behavior and the dynamic drivers of their relationships with prey. This research project likely will extend into additional unexplored realms including lynx foraging ecology in summer, the role of intraspecific competition on the structure of lynx functional responses, and robust lynx population estimation using new technologies and estimators. The PhD student will have the opportunity to develop specific research questions within the scope of the larger project and collaborate with other students and researchers working on related questions in the Kluane system.

Successful candidates MUST have an MSc in Ecology, Conservation Biology, or related field, demonstrated evidence of peer-reviewed publications, strong field and quantitative skills, and an interest in working collaboratively within a large and diverse research group. Additional desirable skills include animal handling, satellite telemetry, remote sensing and GIS analysis, and working in remote field conditions, including during winter.  Start date ASAP.

To apply, send a cover letter, curriculum vitae, unofficial academic transcript, and contact information for 3 references to: Dennis Murray (dennismurray@trentu.ca).

For additional details, see www.dennismurray.ca and www.ualberta.ca/science/about-us/contact-us/faculty-directory/stan-boutin.

The position will be filled as soon as a suitable candidate is found.

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PhD project – Snowshoe hare winter movement ecology and responses to predation risk in the Yukon

The Integrative Wildlife Conservation lab at Trent University is initiating a PhD project on the winter movement and predator-prey dynamics of snowshoe hares at Kluane Lake, Yukon. Snowshoe hares have been studied for >30 years on-site, and we are launching an assessment of the role of winter food and cover on hare movements and population dynamics. Using GPS telemetry and accelerometry, combined with detailed assessment of structural cover and food patches on the landscape, we will evaluate hare movements, habitat selection, and behaviour in relation to environmental risks (predation) and rewards (nutrition). Our recent work (Boudreau et al. 2019 doi: 10.1007/s00442-019-04500-2; Peers et al. 2020. doi.org/10.1038/s41558-020-00908-4; Shiratsuru et al. 2021 doi.org/10.1002/ecy.3456) suggests that hares live on the fine edge of high risk from predation, and the new work may also involve assessing hare movement ecology in the context of energy landscapes that vary dynamically with accumulation/melt of snow in winter, and the implications of climate change on these dynamics. Because we also instrument Canada lynx with GPS collars at Kluane, there are excellent opportunities to evaluate complex predator-prey spatial interactions. An evolving interest is assessing how individual hares vary their risk-reward tradeoff through phases of the 10-year hare population cycle. The PhD student will have the opportunity to develop specific research questions within the scope of the larger project and collaborate with other students and researchers working on related questions in the Kluane system.

Successful candidates MUST have an MSc in Ecology, Conservation Biology, or related field, demonstrated evidence of peer-reviewed publications, strong field and quantitative skills, and an interest in working collaboratively within a large and diverse research group. Additional desirable skills include animal handling, GPS telemetry, application of animal movement models, and working in remote field conditions, including during winter.  For additional details, see www.dennismurray.ca. Start date: ASAP.

To apply, send a cover letter, curriculum vitae, unofficial academic transcript, and contact information for 3 references to: Dennis Murray (dennismurray@trentu.ca).

The position will be filled as soon as a suitable candidate is found.

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MSc position on the effects of cryopreservation of sperm for the maintenance of endangered Atlantic salmon populations

MSc position on the effects of cryopreservation of sperm for the maintenance of endangered Atlantic salmon populations

Saint Mary’s University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada

We are looking for a MSc graduate student interested in working on conservation of endangered Atlantic salmon populations. The project involves research examining the potential effects cryopreservation of gametes may have on the fitness and genetics of young produced to support conservation breeding efforts. Specifically, this project will evaluate fertilization success, offspring survival and performance, and possible epigenetic effects of sperm cryopreservation. This project will occur in collaboration with Dr. Trevor Pitcher (https://pitcherlab.ca/).

The student will be based out of Dr. Laura Weir’s lab at Saint Mary’s University in Halifax, Nova Scotia. Dr. Weir’s broader research programme examines various aspects of the evolution of sexually-selected traits such as behaviour, morphology and sperm characteristics, within and among different mating systems in fishes. We ask fundamental evolutionary and applied approaches, and do so in a collaborative environment, with a team of undergraduate and graduate students who interact regularly with students across a variety of disciplines within the Biology Department, including those who study fish physiology and behavioural ecology.

Location: Saint Mary’s University is located in Halifax, Nova Scotia, a city of over 400,000 people and home to five universities with a vibrant student community. In addition to being a vibrant urban center, the city is surrounded by easily accessible wilderness areas, and is a hub city in the Atlantic provinces with direct connections to other cities in Eastern Canada and the Northeast United States.

Start date: September 2021

Funding: Minimum stipend of $19,000/year. Students will be encouraged to apply for external scholarships. This position is open to Canadian or international students, but tuition costs are high for non-Canadians so additional funding is required.

To apply: If interested, please send a CV, transcript, and a short cover letter describing your interest and experience: laura.weir@smu.ca. Deadline for applications is July 19, 2021 but applications will be reviewed as they are received. Students will be required to travel from Halifax to an on-site location during Fall 2021 and Winter/Spring 2022.

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Ph.D. position to study benthic movements of adult lobsters Homarus americanus in the Bay of Fundy

Note: This opportunity is contingent on the success of recent funding applications to the Department of Fisheries and Oceans and the New Brunswick Innovation Foundation.

Project description: The project will construct individual-based models to infer migration paths of adult American lobster in the Bay of Fundy/Gulf of Maine based on archival tag data and an ocean model of the study domain’s bathymetry and temperature. It will provide the most detailed data existing concerning these movements, which will improve our understanding of their contribution to connectivity between inshore-offshore populations and between Lobster Fishing Areas, as well as of the timing and location of female hatch. This work is a collaboration with fishermen associations in the Bay of Fundy.

Necessary qualifications: This project requires a highly motivated student with an M.Sc. degree, a strong quantitative background as well as programming experience using R, Matlab, Python, or a similar language. It also requires a student with field work experience; experience with work at sea is not necessary but would be an asset.

Academic setting: The Ph.D. student will be co-supervised by Drs. Rémy Rochette (UNB Saint John) and Eric P. Bjorkstedt (NOAA Southwest Fisheries Science Center and Humboldt State University). They will be based in the Department of Biological Sciences at UNB Saint John, which provides education and research programs at the undergraduate, Master’s and PhD levels. The Department has a strong and collegial group of researchers, with a particular research strength in marine and coastal ecosystems. The student will spend 8-12 weeks at Humboldt State University receiving training from E. Bjorkstedt on modeling components of the project.

Financial support: Funding includes 4 years of Ph.D. student stipend, at $22,000/year, as well as all materials, equipment and travels required for the project, including a high-performance computer. International students would see the International Differential Tuition fee waived for the first three years and could be eligible for a Ph.D. International Student Recruitment Award. Students would have the opportunity to apply for other competitive “top up” awards.

How to apply: Send a letter of interest, copy of undergraduate and M.Sc. transcripts, a CV, and the contact information for three references at rochette@unb.ca. Review of applicants will begin on 12 July 2021 and will continue until the position is filled. The start data will either be September 2021 or January 2022.

Rémy, Rochette, Ph.D.
Professor
UNIVERSITY OF NEW BRUNSWICK
PO BOX 5050
Saint John, NB
Canada E2L 4L5
506-648-5988 Office
506-648-5565 Department
rochette@unb.ca

 

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PhD and PDF positions – Trent University and Environment and Climate Change Canada

Drs. Paul Wilson (Trent) and Micheline Manseau (ECCC, Trent) through
EcoGenomics (ecogenomicscanada.ca), a long-term national scale
project, are recruiting PhDs and PDFs focusing on genomic
applications to caribou conservation. Positions may be based out of
Peterborough, Ontario at Trent University or Ottawa at Environment &
Climate Change Canada (ECCC).

Different projects are available ranging from conservation genomics,
molecular evolution, bioinformatics and machine learning, estimating
population parameters, landscape genomics and ancient/historic DNA.

Send a Cover Letter and CV to pawilson@trentu.ca.

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