Wek’eezhii Land and Water Board, Regulatory Specialist (Indeterminate) & Regulatory Specialist (One-Year Term), Yellowknife, Northwest Territories – Application deadline: August 22, 2021

The Tlicho People have strong, traditional ties to the land, water, and wildlife, so ensuring responsible use of land and water for the benefit of Tlicho People is of paramount importance. The Wek’eezhii Land and Water Board is an affirmative action employer. Land claim beneficiaries are strongly encouraged to apply.

The Regulatory Specialist is responsible for coordinating submissions made to the Board, managing public reviews, conducting environmental impact assessments, liaising with government, industry, First Nations, and other stakeholders, managing various projects, and carrying out technical reviews.

If you have communication and environmental and/or technical experience and are interested in joining a high-performing team in a fast-paced, progressive, and dynamic environment, we encourage you to apply.

The successful applicant will have a relevant degree and demonstrate the following competencies in their cover letter and resume:

  • strong technical writing ability;
  • strong written and oral communications skills;
  • project and time management;
  • cultural awareness; and
  • an understanding of relevant environmental legislation.

The starting salary for this position ranges from $89,861 to $93,272 per year plus a comprehensive benefits package that includes over $20,000 per year in allowances. Interested candidates should submit their cover letter and resume by Sunday, August 22, 2021 to:

Attn: Ryan Fequet

RE: Regulatory Specialist Competition

e-mail: rfequet@wlwb.ca

Only those applicants selected for an interview will be contacted. Masi for your interest in this competition.

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Sahtu Land and Water Board, REGULATORY TECHNICIAN and REGULATORY SPECIALIST, Fort Good Hope, NT – Application deadline: August 29, 2021

The SLWB is an Affirmative Action employer and is a highly respected organization with a collaborative and dynamic work environment. We are focused on fulfilling our mandate to provide for the conservation, development and utilization of land and water resources for the optimum benefit of residents of the Mackenzie Valley resource management area of the Northwest Territories and for all Canadians. We are also an integrated organization entrusted in respecting the objectives of the Sahtu Dene and Metis Comprehensive Land Claim Agreement.  Beneficiaries of the Claim are encouraged to apply. Combinations of education and experience are equally assessed.

We are seeking energetic and highly organized individuals for two different positions to support reviews and assessments of applications for land and water use and deposit of waste in the Mackenzie Valley region.

1) Regulatory Technician

The Regulatory Technician is responsible for providing administrative and logistical support for and participating in reviews of applications, submissions, and other environmental issues. The Regulatory Technician works closely with Regulatory Specialists providing support in environmental review processes and maintaining the online public registry. Successful applicants will preferably have post-secondary college or university training in environmental technology and/or sustainable resource planning and management.  Related experience in environmental, regulatory and technical assessments, standard environmental sampling, measurement and analysis techniques, and GIS and database are an asset. The following competencies must be demonstrated in a cover letter and resume: proficient use of computer systems and programs including Microsoft Office products, good written and oral communication skills, good organizational skills, and familiarity with Indigenous culture and values and Territorial and Indigenous governments. The starting salary for this position ranges from $74,580 to $77,537 per year plus a comprehensive benefits package that includes over $20,000 per year in allowances.

2) Regulatory/Communications Specialist

The Regulatory Specialist is responsible for coordinating submissions made to the Board, managing public reviews, participating in environmental impact assessments, liaising with government, industry, First Nations, and other stakeholders, managing various projects, and assisting in technical reviews. Part of this position responsibility will be for community engagement and outreach work. Successful applicants will preferably have a degree in humanities or social science from a college or university and two or more years related experience and/or training. Familiarity in conducting in-depth regulatory, environmental scientific and technical reviews would be an asset. Successful applicants must demonstrate the following competencies in their cover letter and resume: strong technical writing ability; strong written and oral communication skills; ability to use all Microsoft Office products; project and time management; cultural awareness and competence; and an understanding of relevant environmental legislation. The starting salary for this position ranges from $89,861 to $93,272 per year plus a comprehensive benefits package that includes over $20,000 per year in allowances.

Interested candidates should submit their cover letter and resume to Paul Dixon at paul.dixon@slwb.com by August 29, 2021. Only those applicants selected for interviews will be contacted. Thank you for your interest in these competitions.

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Temperature and Transients: PhD Positions in Population Ecology – Kim Cuddington (http://ecotheory.uwaterloo.ca), University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada

We have two graduate positions focused on developing mechanistic
models that relate thermal responses to short term population dynamics
(transients).  Our lab uses large datasets, computational, statistical
and mathematical approaches to answer questions about ectothermic
invasive species, species at risk and ecosystem engineers.  We are
particularly interested in the role of temperature extremes, variance
and autocorrelation in determining risks of invasive, extinction and
ecosystem impacts.

Positions to begin January 2022, but a remote start is possible
depending on travel restrictions at that time. We provide four years
of funding for students in a PhD program.

Please send an inquiry email providing an unofficial transcript, a
brief statement of research interests in ecology, and contact
information for three references (kcuddingATuwaterlooDOTca). The
application for graduate studies is here
(https://uwaterloo.ca/graduate-studies/application-admission/apply-online),
but please contact me directly regarding the deadlines.

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PHD (2) AND POSTDOC (1) POSITIONS OFFERED – People and trees: intimately connected by a shared microbiome in an urban world

AIM: Identify the direct and indirect impacts of urban tree diversity on public health to help city-planners reduce the incidence of autoimmune diseases in at-risk populations. 

Because this aim is considerable, we seek to constitute a team of members with complementary interests and skills. The specific tasks of each member will be determined at hiring.

OBJECTIVES: Over a gradient of social inequalities in two Canadian cities, we will: (1) compile tree diversity indicators using advanced ground-based and 3D remote sensing approaches; (2) identify and quantify airborne microorganisms, pollen, and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted by urban trees; (3) measure relationships between tree diversity, microbial diversity, pollen, VOCs, and public health (i.e., prevalence of asthma and allergies). Finally, we will (4) disseminate our results through an application that will allow end-users to estimate the health value of city-planning scenarios at the neighborhood level.

Click here for more information.

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PHD PROJECT IN FOREST GENETICS – Genetics and physiology of water stress in white spruce

Description: Assisted migration has been proposed as a proactive measure to maintain productivity and reduce the vulnerability of forest ecosystems to climate change. Seed transfer models have been developed to guide the choice of sources best adapted to the future climate and must incorporate the risks associated with drought events.

Click here for more information.

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POSTDOCTORAL POSITION OFFERED – Research Chair on the urban forest and PaqLab, UQAM

Career goal.

To find a better job quickly (but not too quickly). And you get paid to do it!

Reason.

Your predecessors were successful.

Conditions.

Competitive salary (!) and benefits to match. In other words, Canadian academia will do anything to make sure you achieve the goal above.

Job description.

  • Pursue your own research projects, in line with the interests of the Chair and the PaqLab
  • Publish lots of papers
  • Share your skills with the students of the lab
  • Possible co-supervisions at different levels (interns, MSc, PhD)
  • Help with grant writing
  • Participate actively in the life of the lab

Prospective candidates should contact us with the following information:

  • Letter of interest – tell us why you are interested
  • CV – tell us about yourself, because it’s not just about grades
  • Contact information for two references

Informal inquiries are welcome. Position based at UQAM (Montreal) – flexible start date, but soon. Think you’re out of luck because of your background, a disability, or the way you dress? Relax, we don’t care, because innovation is born from diversity. The PaqLab offers an inclusive, equitable, respectful, healthy, and open-minded work environment (because we work there too!). I’m also a member of the Centre for Forest Research (CFR), and so will you. You are not doing this for the money, I know (!) but in case you are interested, your salary will be around 50,000$, for an initial one year contract.

Alain Paquette
Chaire de recherche sur la forêt urbaine
Centre for Forest Research (CFR)
Université du Québec à Montréal
paqlab.uqam.ca
paquette.alain@uqam.ca

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Master of Science opportunity — Trent University

Conservation Value Assessment of the Boreal Forest

We are seeking an energetic, dedicated individual to conduct biogeographic research on the conservation value of the boreal forest in North America.  Starting September 2021, the student will enrol in the interdisciplinary Environmental & Life Sciences Graduate Program at Trent University.   The successful candidate will work under the supervision of Dr. James Schaefer (Trent University) and Dr. Stephen Mayor (Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources & Forestry), in close collaboration with Dr. Jeff Wells (National Audubon Society).

The goal of the project is to undertake conservation value accounting of the North American boreal forest — an evaluation the importance of this biome (one of the last great, intact tracts of forest on the planet) for various taxa, with a focus on mammals, trees, and insects.  Using GIS, the student will assemble digitized range maps to estimate the proportion of the total range of each species in the biome, then apply relative abundance measures to estimate the numbers of individuals for each species in the boreal.  The result will be a description of the conservation value and stewardship responsibility for each province and territory.

Stipend: Approximately $19,477 per year for 2 years (which includes a Teaching Assistantship of $11,177 per year for 2 years)

Application deadline: Applications will be reviewed promptly, with the intent of filling this position by January 2021.

Email a letter describing your interests along with your curriculum vitae and an unofficial copy of your transcripts to Prof. James Schaefer, jschaefer@trentu.ca

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Post-doc opportunity in conservation biology: species at risk (SAR) & invasive species in a Priority Place

The Rooney Lab is recruiting a PDF to apply the Conservation Standards approach to assess the threats of invasive species in wetlands of Ontario’s Priority Place, Long Point Walsingham Forest, with special emphasis on species at risk recovery
More Info: https://uwaterloo.ca/rooney-lab

Background: Environment & Climate Change Canada–Canadian Wildlife Service (ECCC-CWS) released their conservation and action plan for the Long Point Walsingham Forest Priority Place, following the Open Standards for the Practice of Conservation

(https://conservationstandards.org/about/).

Invasive species were identified as a key threat to the coastal wetlands through this process, leading to the goal that 90% of the vegetation in the Coastal Wetlands be native by 2025.

Duties: Work collaboratively with partners in ECCC-CWS, Nature Conservancy of Canada, Ducks Unlimited Canada, Birds Canada to develop a strategy using the Conservation Standards. Develop a wetland monitoring program to support early detection/rapid response of novel invasive wetland plants & support the safe management of established ones. Evaluate the effects of invasive Phragmites australis management on select SAR & native vegetation recovery. Participate actively in lab learning and collaborative research endeavors, including mentoring graduate students.

  • Start date flexible, but commence by January 2022
  • $50,000/y for two years, with renewal contingent on performance

Required: PhD in Conservation Biology, Invasion Biology, or related field; a record of research excellence and scientific publishing; strong oral and written communication skills; demonstrated ability to work collaboratively with NGO and government partners; expertise in env. monitoring and assessment.

 Desired: Experience with the Conservation Standards; past successes in knowledge co-production with non-academic partners; technical skills in experimental design, community analysis, coding in R.

Instructions: Applications due July 30, 2021. Email rrooney@uwaterloo.ca, Subject: Priority Place PDF 2021; 1) cover letter stating your research interests and relevant experience; 2) a short CV noting your scientific and leadership contributions; 3) contact information for 3 references.  Only short-listed applicants will be contacted. Rooney Lab is committed to equity in hiring and BIPOC and LGBTQ2S+ individuals are encouraged to apply.

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PhD project – Application of remote sensing tools for assessing boreal forest dynamics in the Yukon

The Integrative Wildlife Conservation lab at Trent University is offering a PhD project on the application of remote sensing technologies for monitoring boreal forest structure and function near Kluane Lake, Yukon. For decades we have conducted research on Canada lynx and their prey in the Kluane region, and the current project extends these investigations into the realm of vegetation and snow dynamics in this rapidly-changing northern landscape. Using a recently-acquired unmanned aerial vehicle equipped with LiDAR, multispectral, hyperspectral, thermal and RGB cameras, we will investigate: 1) how patterns of forest productivity vary dynamically across space and time; 2) sources of forest heterogeneity and resiliency to climate change and insect outbreaks; and 3) how snow conditions vary through time and affect wildlife habitat availability. In addition, this project provides several additional opportunities and potential collaborations with ongoing research related to: 4) validating cutting-edge remote sensing technologies in forest health assessment; 5) forecasting future boreal forest dynamics under climate change; and 6) relating forest characteristics to the movements and habitat selection of Canada lynx and snowshoe hares that are radio-collared with GPS transmitters. The PhD student will have the opportunity to develop specific research questions within the scope of the larger project.

Successful candidates MUST have an MSc in Ecology, Remote Sensing, or related field, demonstrated evidence of peer-reviewed publications, strong field and quantitative skills, and an interest in working collaboratively within a large and diverse research group. Additional desirable skills include application of GIS technologies and related software, experience in drone operation, and working in remote field conditions.  Start date is ASAP.

To apply, send a cover letter, curriculum vitae, unofficial academic transcript, and contact information for 3 references to: Dennis Murray (dennismurray@trentu.ca).

For additional details, see www.dennismurray.ca.

The position will be filled as soon as a suitable candidate is found.

 

 

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PhD project – Canada lynx population ecology and predator-prey dynamics in the Yukon

The Integrative Wildlife Conservation lab at Trent University is offering a PhD project on lynx population dynamics and foraging ecology near Kluane Lake, Yukon. Our research on lynx and their prey in the Kluane region spans decades, and the current project builds on our recent work assessing the functional response of lynx to different prey types and how such relationships are more complex than previously thought (see Chan et al. 2017, Ecology DOI:10.1002/ecy.1828; Studd, E. et al. 2021. doi.org/10.1111/2041-210X.13605b.). Specifically, through lynx satellite telemetry and accelerometry, and assessment of prey distribution and abundance, we aim to understand the mechanisms driving lynx movements and population dynamics relative to their primary (snowshoe hare) and secondary (red squirrel) prey species across space and time. We have studied lynx intensively for 6 winters during a period of hare abundance and decline at Kluane, so the ongoing cyclic crash in hare numbers presents a fascinating opportunity to assess variation in lynx foraging behavior and the dynamic drivers of their relationships with prey. This research project likely will extend into additional unexplored realms including lynx foraging ecology in summer, the role of intraspecific competition on the structure of lynx functional responses, and robust lynx population estimation using new technologies and estimators. The PhD student will have the opportunity to develop specific research questions within the scope of the larger project and collaborate with other students and researchers working on related questions in the Kluane system.

Successful candidates MUST have an MSc in Ecology, Conservation Biology, or related field, demonstrated evidence of peer-reviewed publications, strong field and quantitative skills, and an interest in working collaboratively within a large and diverse research group. Additional desirable skills include animal handling, satellite telemetry, remote sensing and GIS analysis, and working in remote field conditions, including during winter.  Start date ASAP.

To apply, send a cover letter, curriculum vitae, unofficial academic transcript, and contact information for 3 references to: Dennis Murray (dennismurray@trentu.ca).

For additional details, see www.dennismurray.ca and www.ualberta.ca/science/about-us/contact-us/faculty-directory/stan-boutin.

The position will be filled as soon as a suitable candidate is found.

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